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The Vampire Book

The Ultimate Collection of Vampire Facts and Fiction

Death and immortality, sexual prowess and surrender, intimacy and alienation, rebellion and temptation. The allure of the vampire is eternal. The Vampire Book: The Encyclopedia of the Undead, Third edition, explores the historical, literary, mythological, biographical, and popular aspects of one of the world’s most mesmerizing paranormal subject. This vast reference is an alphabetical tour of the psychosexual, macabre world of the soul-sucking undead.

In the first fully revised and updated edition in a decade, Dr. J. Gordon Melton (president of the American chapter of the Transylvania Society of Dracula) bites even deeper into vampire lore, myths, reported realities, and legends that come from all around the world. From Vlad the Impaler to Dracula and from modern literature to movies and TV series like Buffy the Vampire Slayer, True Blood, Twilight, and The Vampire Lestat, this exhaustive guide furnishes more than 400 essays to quench your thirst for facts, biographies, definitions, and more.

The Twilight of the Gothic?

This book explores the history of the paranormal romance genre; from its origins in the revisionist horror fiction of the 1970s, via its emergence as a minor sub-genre of romantic fiction in the early 1990s, to its contemporary expansion in recent years into an often-controversial genre of mainstream fiction. Tracing the genre from its roots in older Gothic fiction written by and for women, it explores the interconnected histories of Gothic and romantic fiction, from Ann Radcliffe and Jane Austen in the eighteenth century to Buffy, Twilight, True Blood and The Vampire Diaries in the present day. In doing so, it investigates the extent to which the post-Twilight paranormal romance really does represent a break from older traditions of Gothic fiction – and just what it is about the genre that has made it so extraordinarily divisive, captivating millions of readers whilst simultaneously infuriating and repelling so many others.

I Am Legend

 Robert Neville is the last living man on Earth… but he is not alone. Every other man, woman and child on the planet has become a vampire, and they are hungry for Neville’s blood.

By day he is the hunter, stalking the undead through the ruins of civilisation. By night, he barricades himself in his home and prays for the dawn.

How long can one man survive like this?

Lost

Winifred Rudge, a bemused writer struggling to get beyond the runaway success of her mass-market astrology book, travels to London to jump-start her new novel about a woman who is being haunted by the ghost of Jack the Ripper. Upon her arrival, she finds that her stepcousin and old friend John Comestor has disappeared, and a ghostly presence seems to have taken over his home. Is the spirit Winnie’s great-great-grandfather, who, family legend claims, was Charles Dickens’s childhood inspiration for Ebenezer Scrooge? Could it be the ghostly remains of Jack the Ripper? Or a phantasm derived from a more arcane and insidious origin? Winnie begins to investigate and finds herself the unwilling audience for a drama of specters and shades—some from her family’s peculiar history and some from her own unvanquished past.

In the spirit of A. S. Byatt’s Possession, with dark echoing overtones of A Christmas Carol, Lost presents a rich fictional world that will enrapture its readers.

Genreflecting

Anyone who advises young adult or adult readers will benefit from this guide, which covers such popular genres as western, crime, adventure, romance, science fiction, fantasy, and horror. Herald defines each genre, describes its characteristics and subgenres, and groups authors according to type or subject of their books. She also provides a selective, annotated bibliography of the history and criticism of each genre. This edition of Rosenberg’s classic lists more authors, series characters, and titles than ever before.

Aliens in the Home

Within the broad field of contemporary literature, horror fiction has only recently developed into a genre which modern scholars may legitimately regard as being worthy of critical attention. This comparative study provides ample proof that horror fiction can be more profound and revealing than many literary critics imagined. The only study of its kind, this book offers detailed critical analysis of the child in horror fiction, with special emphasis on themes relating to the child’s social position within the family and its war against parents or authority figures, as well as its various functions as victim, evil innocent, and monster. Special attention is given to the child’s consistent, stylized portrayal in horror fiction, which forms a sharp contrast to the appearance of children both in other genres and in real life.

Frightening Fiction

Edited by Morag Styles and written by an international team of acknowledged experts, this series provides jargon-free, critical discussion and a comprehensive guide to literary and popular texts for children. Each book introduces the reader to a major genre of children’s literature, covering the key authors, major works and contexts in which those texts are published, read and studied.

The development of the horror genre in children’s literature has been a startling phenomenon – one that has provoked strong, but mixed, reactions. Frightening Fiction provides a lucid and lively guide to that genre, ranging from analyses of such popular series as Point Horror, Goosebumps, the X Files and the Buffy stories, to the work of individual authors such as Robert Westall, David Almond, Philip Gross and Lesley Howarth.

American Reference Books Annual

1970- issued in 2 vols.: v. 1, General reference, social sciences, history, economics, business; v. 2, Fine arts, humanities, science and engineering.

Madame Audrey’s Guide to Mostly Cheap But Good Reference Books for Small and Rural Libraries

This reference is a guide to locating fundamental reference sources for developing and maintaining a small-but-strong reference collection. It also identifies titles to add to enhance and update the collection, organized according to Dewey and cross-referenced with LC classification numbers.

Library Services for Adults in the 21st Century

Public librarians are directly responsible for providing a large proportion of the American population with access to the Internet and guidance in obtaining important government information. Effectively servicing today’s adult library users is already a pressing need, and will only become a larger priority as the nation’s population ages.

Library Services for Adults in the 21st Century is for library science students interested in working with adults in public libraries. As the first text dedicated to adult library services to be published since 1991, this title has been sorely needed and much anticipated. This book will provide a model for training public librarians for the specific challenges of providing adult services. Part I provides a survey of the history and development of Adult services. Part II addresses planning and tools for service development. Part III examines the different types of services for adults and best practices, while Part IV presents training methods.

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